Featured Articles:
Vol. 7, Issue 2

Due to the common nature of the condition, symptomatic low-grade (I and II) hemorrhoids are a patient complaint frequently encountered in GI practices—one with which most gastroenterology fellows will become familiar from the start of the fellowship.

Vol. 7, Issue 2

A 56-year-old man gradually developed shortness of breath and was not able to tolerate regular physical activity. He went to his primary care physician and blood tests revealed severe anemia. Upper endoscopy and colonoscopy did not reveal the source of bleeding, and the patient was referred to Mercy Medical Center for double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) to evaluate the small bowel as a possible site of the GI bleeding.

Vol. 7, Issue 1

Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are common, and diagnosed by specific symptom complexes. FGIDs are defined by Rome IV criteria in the absence of anatomic or organic causes.

Vol. 7, Issue 1

Patients suffering from symptoms suggestive of gastroparesis and chronic constipation frequently present with vague, nonspecific, and overlapping symptoms, often making it a challenge to provide a unifying diagnosis.

Vol. 6, Issue 2

For confirming the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients suffering from upper gastrointestinal symptoms, objective testing is always recommended prior to surgical intervention.1 However, in selected patients, such testing is increasingly being employed to assess the efficacy of treatment with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI).

Vol. 6, Issue 2

Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is estimated to affect 18% to 28% of the US population. An empirical trial of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is a common starting point. Endoscopy is performed when alarm symptoms (eg, dysphagia, anemia, weight loss) are present, or if symptoms do not improve with PPIs.

Vol. 6, Issue 1

Due to its ability to detect disease activity in the small bowel, capsule endoscopy (CE) can play an essential role in ensuring that patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) are receiving adequate treatment. Mucosal healing can be confirmed by this technology by verifying that inflammation is managed throughout areas of potential involvement.

Vol. 6, Issue 1

Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that can potentially affect the entire gastrointestinal tract. While the therapeutic arsenal for CD has been historically limited, during the last decade, newer therapeutic agents have become available and have dramatically improved outcomes, increasing the rate of intestinal mucosal healing and decreasing long-term complications.

Vol. 5, Issue 2

Ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (PDAC), the most common malignant tumor of the pancreas, is a leading cause of cancer death in the United States and now has a dismal 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. Much of its poor prognosis can be attributed to the non-specific clinical symptoms associated with early-stage disease.

Vol. 5, Issue 2

For the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal tract malignancies, the relative roles of fine needle aspiration (FNA) and fine needle biopsy (FNB) are being reevaluated. In endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided acquisition of tissues, including esophageal, gastric, pancreaticobiliary, and rectal tissues among others, use of FNA remains a gold standard.